10 tips for Protecting Kids from Identity Theft

child id theftLast week, I co-hosted a chat on Twitter with Clay Nichols from LookOut Social and CSID.  We spent an hour chatting with security experts, teachers and parents about how to protect children’s identity online. We shared how identity thieves are targeting kids by searching their social media accounts for personal information. With their information, thieves can often impersonate them for years without being detected. Everyone had lots of great tips for how to safeguard children. If you want to see them all CSID created a page on Storify for the #cyberSAFEchat tweets.

As promised, here are 10 tips from our chat.

 

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Need more information on Child Identity Theft:

Child Identity Theft and Privacy Chat on April 7

child id theftIn 2011, a report from Carnegie Mellon Cylab discovered children were 51 times more likely than adults to have their identity stolen. The reasons for this is children have an unblemished credit record and thieves can use their social security numbers for years before being discovered. Since 2011, the concern over child identity theft has only grown. Now, several states are proposing laws to allow parents to freeze their children’s social security number until they are 18.

To shed light on what parents and kids can do to protect their identity, CSID is hosting a tweet chat and a webinar next week. On April 7, I am co-hosting the tweet chat with CSID and Lookout Social. We will discuss child identity theft including how thieves target kids, how social media impact kid’s identities and what parents and kids can do to keep their information safe. If you are on Twitter, I hope you can join us.

If you are not on Twitter, you may want take this opportunity to check it out. This is a popular site for teens and a following a chat is a great way to see how Twitter works. A tweet chat is a live discussion around a certain topic on Twitter. To take part in the chat, log in to Twitter at the set time (in this case April 7 at 11 am PT) and click on the designated hashtag (in this case #cyberSAFEchat). Everyone participating in this conversation will use this hashtag. So, when you click on #cyberSAFEchat, you can see everyone’s questions and comments. If you want to comment just add this hashtag to your tweet. If you miss the chat, I will have a follow up post with the top 10 tweets.

 

Mark your calendars!

Join CSID, LookOutSocial and KidsPrivacy

for the Twitter Chat on Child Identify Theft and Privacy

Monday, April 7 at 11 AM – 12 PM PT #cyberSAFEchat.

 

Educate Family Members About Digital Scams With Snopes.com

marti westonThis post is from one of my favorite bloggers, Marti Weston. Her blog Media! Tech! Parenting! is a fantastic resource for parents on helping kids to become thoughtful, collaborative, and savvy digital citizens. She covers everything from the latest apps to how to evaluate a website. Below is an excerpt from her latest post on how to identify online scams.


Educate Family Members About Digital Scams With Snopes.com

By Marti Weston

A week does not go by without students and parents asking me about an Internet scam, a circulating chain mail, a digital rumor, or a wild web story. And on a fairly regular basis, someone — always a good reliable kid or a terrific an reliable parent — forwards a digital missive that initially seems somewhat innocuous, silly, or sarcastic but then unleashes a virus or malware. Sometimes for children the strange digital content causes social problems.

snopesTo learn more about the unusual stories that circulate on the web, I suggest that 21st Century parents introduce Snopes.com to family members as soon as each individual begins using online communication and digital devices. We all need to learn how to consult Snopes resources and navigate around the site for helpful information — the true and reliable info — when strange and unusual content beckons.

Snopes researchers hear about a potential scam, a chain mail, a “too-good-to-be-true” story, something scary, or some outrageous spiel, and they check it out thoroughly, contacting sources and tracing the content. Once they post an explanation on the website, the researchers continue to update it as well as add the information to a database. So when something re-circulates a year or two later, it’s easy to locate current information on the website. Read the Snopes about page.

Read the rest of her article here…